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Accidental Porn Shamers

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Nowadays the internet is flooded with every type of porn to suit any fetish, desire, fantasy or kink. This has become so extreme that even innocent searches produce pornography from the most unlikely of findings (A/N don’t google cream pie). According to the ever popular PornHub stats that excite sexual beings and statisticians the world over every year, they displayed in cold hard figures just how sexually active we are when online. For instance the popularity of the Kardashian’s meant there was a rise in viewings of big booty porn, and the one that shocked me the most was the increase last year in the viewing of Scooby Doo porn (childhood ruined – even more by the fact my dog is called Scooby). When we all seem to be watching and getting off to porn, why do we all pretend we don’t, and flinch at the discussion of it? Why are our browser histories constantly cleared of any evidence, when we are all so sexually liberated? This is what I deem as being an accidental porn shamer; even though we deem ourselves to be sexually progressive and open minded beings we still have a negative or distasteful gut reaction to the topic of porn.

This in part is due to our society, the whole ‘no sex, we’re British’ mentality. As students we see the topic as a lot more open and likely to come up in discussion, but in the wider conversation in Britain we still seem a little Victorian when it comes to sex.  Generally porn and masturbation is considered to be a private activity, so perhaps this is why we assume it’s a topic not up for public discussion. When my boyfriend asked me what porn I watched I defensively barked back ‘none of your business’. And no it isn’t any of his business, but why I am so ashamed to even be asked in the first place is something I can’t quite explain.

We often hear the cries of worried parents “What if my children watch porn!” Kids and teens all seem to have better and fancier phones than me, and if you have access to google 24/7, chances are they will stumble across porn at some point- this combined with a puberty fuelled sex drive means explicit content shall inevitably be viewed. There are fears that porn corrupts young minds, gives unrealistic expectation of bodies and of sex. Parents fear it will turn they’re sons into perverts or their daughters into whores. This can easily be solved; perhaps if sex education was actually educational and practical our teens wouldn’t act on misnomers and would understand that porn is generally a fantasy and an exaggeration designed to get us off.

I’m trying to overcome my own accidental porn shaming behaviours. I mean, I can’t exactly be a sex columnist and get embarrassed when people mention porn. But how is it that we open the discussion? Or will time and liberalism simply do the job for me?

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