This Week’s Need To Know

disabilityhorizons.com

This Sunday will see the close of the Rio 2016 Paralympics, and a four-year break until the best athletes in summer sports will grace our screens once more. I don’t know about you, but I’m sad. Unfortunately since the Olympic games ended on the 21st August, I had to finally acknowledge my dwindling bank balance and sofa-to-activity ratio, and do something with my life. I got a job. I started going to the gym (told you I would!) and accepted, barely, that I wouldn’t be able to dedicate anywhere near as much of my time to the Paralympics as to the Olympics. And it turns out I wasn’t the only one. From a lack of ticket sales, to real-life proof on the telly that there simply isn’t the same volume of crowds as at the Olympics, I thought it only fair to shed some light on the incredible Paralympians representing Great Britain (especially seeing as we are second in the medal table with a casual 109 medals…)

Ellie Robinson, 15

www.itv.com
www.itv.com

Following in the steps (or is that strokes?) of fellow teammate Ellie Simmonds, who made a splash when she swept up at the 2012 games, Robinson won Britain their tenth gold when she dominated the 50m S6 butterfly event. She narrowly missed out on another medal during the 400m S6 freestyle event, but at fifteen I highly doubt we’ve seen the last of her.

Jeanette Chippington, 46

www.efds.co.uk
www.efds.co.uk

Imagine winning two Paralypic golds in swimming, after representing your country at four consecutive games and then twenty years later deciding that you aren’t quite finished, so you make your comeback at the 2016 Rio games, except this time in a canoe. Oh, and you win gold. That’s Jeanette Chippington’s reality.

Richard Whitehead, 29

commons.wikimedia.org
commons.wikimedia.org

The T42 100m sprint was one of the few events I managed to watch, and if you haven’t seen Whiteheads performance, please, please YouTube it. As the only double amputee in the race, his start didn’t look great – but it turns out all you need to go from last to second is ten meters. No biggie.

So, that’s almost it for another four years. Hasn’t it been fun? Hasn’t it made you realise what a huge waster you’ve been your entire life? No? Just me, then. See you next week.

 

 

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