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Let’s Talk Nude

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The word ‘nude’ is something that is often thrown around in the fashion and beauty world. From bloggers frequently raving about their new favourite ‘nude’ coloured lipstick and camel toned outfits hitting the catwalk, to headlines screaming out about how nude outfits are the new trend. However, this idea of ‘nude’ is often an exclusive colour that does not align with the fact that ‘nude’ is often used as a synonym for ‘skin toned’.

Fashion is not always inclusive. This is something we as a society are becoming more and more aware of. Ashley Graham is paving the way for plus sized women in modelling, Stella Maxwell is at the top of her modelling game whilst publically dating Kristen Stewart, and the New York Fashion Week AW15 collaboration between FTL Moda and Fondazione Vertical, an Italian foundation supporting research to cure spinal cord injuries, placed models with disabilities at the heart of fashion. However, change is not often fast for all areas. Complaints are regularly made about fashion campaigns for their white-centric advertisements, and makeup brands are often faced with complaints that their foundation and concealer shades aren’t inclusive for all skin tones.

In 2013, Christian Louboutin made a step in the right direction, and became more inclusive for women of all races with their Nudes collection. Louboutin’s shoes have often been regarded as the epitome of glamor, with their price point certainly reflecting this high class view, and now these glamorous shoes have become accessible to even more women with the recent expansion of the Nudes collection to include two new shoe designs.

The cheaper of the two new shoes, the Christevera, is priced at £595 and has a 100mm stiletto heel and espadrille laces.

eu.christianlouboutin.com

eu.christianlouboutin.com

The Cherrysandal is priced at £635, and features a 140mm heel and elements of PVC.

eu.christianlouboutin.com

eu.christianlouboutin.com

Each shoe comes in 7 colours, ranging from ‘Lea Nue’ to ‘Toudou’, and this shade range does seem fairly diverse for a pair of shoes. Whilst to some, this may seem a small change, this decision shows Louboutin living up to his quote that ‘Nude is not a colour; it’s a concept’. The phrase ‘nude’ does not automatically equally light-toned, and that common misconception should be dispelled from the fashion and beauty world.

In some ways it feels almost condescending to commend a change that feels so long in the making. Beige and cream are certainly not the skin tone of everyone, and the ability to buy shoes that work well as a nude for your skin tone should be available to everyone, even though some women will be unable to purchase these shoes because of the price point. Whilst it is true that these shoes are unavailable to most because of their price, and will certainly be too expensive for us students, fans of the film The Devil Wears Prada will know that fashion trickles down, starting from the decisions made by high end designers, and eventually ending up in ASOS, Topshop, and New Look. Though this view on things may make diversity seem like a trend, a decision such as this will hopefully be seen as successful, and will then be replicated by high street stores, giving all women access to a classic accessory.

One Comment

  1. yas says:

    Excellent points made!

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